Posts in the Historical genre

Guest Post

Guest Post: “The Freshness Factor” by Grace Burrowes

Daniel's True Desire Grace Burrowes

If I have a chance to ask other authors one question, often it will be, “How do you keep the creative well from running dry?” Authors like Jennifer Ashley, who does high-quality, prolific work across several fiction genres, fascinate me. How does she dooooo that? Carolyn Jewel spans both paranormal and Regency sub-genres, and other authors—Julia Quinn, for example—can go back to the Regency, and even to the same family groups in the Regency, over and over and come up with one excellent tale after another.

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Guest Post

Guest Post: “A Few Great Gay Historical Romances” by Kate McMurray

Such a Dance Kate McMurray

I’ve heard from readers that gay historical romances are a tough sell—could be people who could be breaking the law by being together really find happy endings?

Yes, they did. And not just in novels.

I’m a huge history nerd, and I read all manner of romance, so seeking out gay historicals was a pretty natural thing for me to do. And there are some fantastic ones out there. I picked six, kind of at random; think of this as a jumping off point to the many others that are out there.

Bonds of Earth by G.N. Chevalier

This book is kind of a gothic romance set in Jazz Age New York, so it has this odd contrast of the characters caught in a secluded mansion juxtaposed against the excesses of the era. It’s a story of two broken men, one of them who goes to the estate of the other to tend to its gardens, though he has some experience as a masseuse as well. The book deals with the fallout from World War I, which is one of those periods in history that I think gets glossed over quite a bit, or lost in the glitz of the Jazz Age. It’s beautifully written and compelling.

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Exclusive Excerpt

Exclusive Excerpt: FOREVER AND ALWAYS by Leigh Greenwood

Forever and Always Leigh Greenwood

Leigh Greenwood’s newest release, Forever and Always, hits shelves today, and we’ve got a great excerpt for you to enjoy! Be sure and pick up your copy of Forever and Always today!


From USA Today Bestselling Author Leigh Greenwood comes a historical Western romance filled with gritty cowboy heroes, strong-willed heroines, and a whole lot of heart in the Wild West.

He knows she can never be his…

Logan Holstock, oldest of three brothers orphaned on the Santa Fe Trail, has always been content knowing his brothers were alive and happy somewhere in the vast and brutal West—until he learns he may be dying. Certain he has little time left, Logan sets out to find them and end his days near a family he’s never known…and stumbles across a strong yet vulnerable widow who makes him yearn for what can never be his.

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Guest Post

Guest Post: Eva Leigh on Historical Working Girls

Scandal Takes The Stage Eva Leigh

Eva Leigh’s Wicked Quills of London, launched with Forever Your Earl and the released today Scandal Takes the Stage, introduces a historical series featuring women who work for a living. Eva’s ladies join an exclusive group of historical romance whose heroines are more than just a pretty face. Thanks for sharing, Eva!


Career women weren’t invented with the 1988 film Working Girl. Women have been in the workforce since the beginnings of civilization. They’ve run businesses, created art, involved themselves in politics and social causes, and been far more than decorative for millennia (and beyond).

Historical romance novels don’t ignore this fact. Many have featured heroines who work for a living, in spite of societal strictures that strive to keep women confined to domestic roles.

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Autumn Thorns Yasmine Galenorn
Reviews, Movies, Reviews

Top 5 4 Rochesters On-Screen

In Jane Eyre, Charlotte Bronte created two incredibly memorable characters. The titular Jane is “poor, plain, and little,” but she is also the most stubborn heroine ever, and knows her own worth: “I can live alone, if self-respect, and circumstances require me so to do. I need not sell my soul to buy bliss. I have an inward treasure born with me, which can keep me alive if all extraneous delights should be withheld, or offered only at a price I cannot afford to give.”

Her foil, her true soulmate, is the irascible Mr. Rochester, whom Jane describes as having “broad and jetty eyebrows; his square forehead, made squarer by the horizontal sweep of his black hair. I recognized his decisive nose, more remarkable for character than beauty; his full nostrils, denoting, I thought, choler; his grim mouth, chin, and jaw—yes, all three were very grim, and no mistake.”

Rochester is arrogant, as stubborn as Jane, proud, obnoxious, and manipulative. And yet? And yet he is an iconic hero in literature, and his type shows up in romances as the Alpha male (most recently as a Billionaire rather than a wealthy man with an estate). Since Edward Fairfax Rochester is such a memorable hero, it’s time to round up the Top 4 On-Screen portrayals of Rochester (I stuck with four because these are the ones I think of when I think of Rochester; other people mentioned the William Hurt portrayal, and then there’s Orson Welles hamming it up against Joan Fontaine, but those aren’t MY Rochesters):

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Aural Pleasures

Aural Pleasures: Ally Broadfield’s SAY YOU’LL LOVE ME

Say You'll Love Me Ally Broadfield

Today Ally Broadfield’s Say You’ll Love Me was released and Ally’s stopped by EverAfter to share her playlist and answer our questions! Pick up your copy of Say You’ll Love Me today!


There’s nothing else that can evoke emotions and reactions the way music can, and I almost always have music playing when I write. Once I’ve created the playlist for the book I’m working on, I listen to it whenever I write.

1. How do you make your playlists for your books?

Almost immediately after an idea comes to me for the premise of a new book, a song that fits the story and the main characters will pop into my head, so that’s how my playlist starts. For Say You’ll Love Me, that song is “All I Ask of You.” After that, I add the songs that go on the playlists for all of my books, and then pick another handful of songs that feel right for the plot of each book.

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Guest Post

Guest Post: A Holiday Chat with Authors Carolyn Jewel and Grace Burrowes

Christmas in Duke Street Shana Galen, Miranda Neville, Carolyn Jewel, and Grace Burrowes

When most people think of the holidays, they think of family dinners, decorating the tree, and singing carols by the fire. When authors think of the holidays, we think of stories. Readers seem to love holiday-set books, and we authors love to write them. There’s happily-ever-after and then there’s happily-ever-after on Christmas, which makes the warm fuzzy feeling that much more special.

Grace Burrowes and Carolyn Jewel, two of the authors of the newly released holiday anthology, Christmas in Duke Street, sat down to chat about writing during holiday mayhem, our holiday wishes, and why we love holiday movies and stories.


Grace: Carolyn, I am utterly bumfuzzled to once again be in that posture of, “Where has the year gone?” But if our holiday anthology is on the shelves, then sure as pumpkin spice everything, the holidays are coming. How has your year gone?

Carolyn: The year went drinking and then got carded and couldn’t come back in time to meet us. Or, it has a lead foot and is whooshing by faster then our brains can process. It’s one of those two things.  I’m not sure which. :::Looks at notes. I’m supposed to ask Grace something. Um. Okay:

So, Grace, do the holidays affect your writing?

Grace: Some years, I honestly get MORE writing done over the holidays. Things slow down at work, the weather gives us a few snow days, and I can spend some extra time with the dukes and earls of my choice. My idea of a little Christmas! What about you? Does the writing time have to take a back seat over the holidays?

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Guest Post

Guest Post: Shana Galen and Miranda Neville on Writing During the Holiday Mayhem

Christmas in Duke Street Shana Galen, Miranda Neville, Carolyn Jewel, and Grace Burrowes

When most people think of the holidays, they think of family dinners, decorating the tree, and singing carols by the fire. When authors think of the holidays, we think of stories. Readers seem to love holiday-set books, and we authors love to write them. There’s happily-ever-after and then there’s happily-ever-after on Christmas, which makes the warm fuzzy feeling that much more special.

Shana Galen and Miranda Neville, two of the authors of the newly released holiday anthology, Christmas in Duke Street, sat down to chat about writing during holiday mayhem, our inspiration, and why we love holiday romances.


Miranda: Are you one of those obnoxious early shoppers who has all her gifts wrapped, tagged, and probably color coded by Halloween, or a last-minute-omg run to the mall on Christmas Eve?

Shana: I do love color coding, but I don’t like to buy gifts too early. I usually start shopping right before Thanksgiving and try and finish a week or so before Christmas. What about you, Miranda?

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Reviews, Reviews, TV

The Last Kingdom and Viking Romances!

The Last Kingdom, based on Bernard Cornwell’s Saxon Stories series, debuts on BBC America this week. It is set in the 9th century, and uses the backdrop of real characters from history to people the fictional leads’ stories. Like Vikings, it’s got King Alfred, Ragnar, and mixed loyalties.

Viking romances have been an underrepresented genre in historical romance, but there is plenty there for romance fans to find appealing:

  • Fierce warriors with interesting facial hair.
  • Viking women had more rights than other women during that time period. They could ask for divorce and inherit property.
  • Vikings were very concerned with hygiene.
  • They had kickass gods (Thor, anyone?)
  • They’re not afraid to go the distance — literally! They traveled huge distances to accomplish their goals.

If you haven’t read any Viking romance, there are some available for free from the EverAfter app:

  • Chelsea Chaynes’s Dominated by Vikings: Act 1
  • Lexy Timms’s Celtic Viking (Heart of the Battle Series #1)
  • Lacey Edward’s Bearly a Viking (with bonus paranormal shifter goodness).

Are you planning to watch The Last Kingdom? Do you like Viking romance? Any recommendations?

Steals & Deals

Deal Alert: Amara Royce’s NEVER TOO LATE

Never Too Late Amara Royce

Amara Royce’s older woman/younger man historical romance (set in a bookshop, no less!) is on sale for $.99 for a limited time. Amara’s books are smart and sexy, and well worth your time. Here’s the blurb:

Expect the unexpected, especially in a room filled with books. . .

Honoria Duchamp is well aware that men often consider widows easy prey for the role of mistress. What else could explain the attentions of handsome Lord Devin, and his visits to her bookshop? The much younger Viscount has even shown interest in the printing press with which she creates pamphlets on London’s basest injustices. Yet his chief interest appears to be in her. . .

Coerced to investigate Nora’s controversial pamphlets, Devin expected to find a bookish matron. Instead, he is taken with Nora’s womanly beauty, sharp intellect, and quick wit. Soon, what begins as an unwelcome task becomes a pleasure, and Devin’s job becomes more dangerous—for them both. For Nora has no idea of the vicious element she’s crossed. Now Devin will risk his reputation to protect her—and much more to win her love. . .