Posts Tagged ‘Victorian Romance’

Steals & Deals

Deal Alert: Madeline Martin, Nicola Claire, and Kelly McClymer

It is unseasonably beautiful here, which means it’s time to share some unseasonably beautiful steals! Get these great books from Madeline Martin, Nicola Claire, and Kelly McClymer while they’re on sale!


Deception of a Highlander by Madeline Martin

“A promising debut.”—PUBLISHERS WEEKLY

Scottish Romance doesn’t get much steamier—or more dangerous—than a spy hunting her quarry, and losing her heart to him instead.

To pay a seemingly impossible debt, Mariel Brandon has become a spy for Aaron, one of England’s deadliest minds. Aaron’s latest mission for the sharp-witted and daring Mariel is to find two people in a heavily fortified castle on the Isle of Skye, a castle headed by the clan MacDonald and the powerful Kieran. Mariel is to seduce Kieran and get him to take her to Skye. If she succeeds, Aaron promises to let Mariel’s young brother go, and to free both of them from their debt. If she fails, her brother will die.

What she doesn’t count on is craving Kieran MacDonald almost immediately upon meeting him. Now Mariel must keep a secret from Kieran—one that could get them both killed—as she tries to form a plan that will save her brother, get her out from under Aaron’s thumb once and for all, and keep her in Kieran’s strong arms forever.


Fearless by Nicola Claire

Nicola Claire’s captivating new Gothic romance series introduces a dark and sinister early settler New Zealand at the end of the nineteenth century – brightened by a fearless and talented heroine and a loyal and secretive police inspector…

Free spirit. Brilliant. A Liability?

Doctor Anna Cassidy has been trained by the best; the former Chief Surgeon for the Auckland Police Force. She knows how to dissect a body. She knows how to treat any ailment. And she knows how to find a cause of death.

But society is not ready for a female surgeon.

Fighting for what she believes in has been ingrained in Anna since she was a young child. But the battles she faces now are not all based on equality. A murderer stalks her fellow Suffragettes and the police inspector in charge of the case could be Anna’s downfall.

Experienced. Dedicated. Something to hide?

Inspector Andrew Kelly holds duty and honour in the highest regard. His role as a detective proves just that; he never stops until justice is served. Love is something he has forsaken, for reasons he’d rather you didn’t know.

But Anna is not a woman a man can ignore.

Fighting his instincts with cold determination is something Kelly has become accustomed to. But a murderer is loose in his adopted city, bringing memories to the fore of a killer who walked in the shadows of Whitechapel, and shining light on a dark past the Inspector is trying hard to forget.

A gritty, twisted, and authentic Victorian romantic suspense, sure to rip you apart… just like old Jack.


The Fairy Tale Bride by Kelly McClymer

From USA Today Bestselling author Kelly McClymer comes a tale of two stubborn hearts locked in a duel between honor and happily-ever-after.

“…filled with original, fresh characters, the necessary bad guy, an overbearing mother-in-law and love thwarted and restored.” — Savannah
“The uncertainty of what will happen next, the lies, the deceit all make this a book you don’t want to put down.” — Eileen

Miranda Fenster, known throughout society as the Fairy Tale Miss because she insists that happily ever afters are possible even amongst the arranged marriages of the Victorian aristocracy, is on a mission. Her goal? To rescue her brother. Her adversary? Simon Watterly, Duke of Kerstone. A man who almost offered for her five years before.
Simon has a mission of his own.

Furious with his late father and disillusioned by the honorable facade of society, he believes that family honor requires the ultimate sacrifice from him. Unfortunately, Miranda is determined to change his mind. Will Simon get his wish or will Miranda make him see he deserves a happily ever after?

Guest Post

Guest Post: “My Favorite Movie Romances” by Tara Kingston

When a Lady Deceives Tara Kingston

Since my teens, I’ve loved reading romance laced with adventure and suspense. Historical, paranormal, contemporary…if a story has great characters I can relate to, a heart-racing quest, and a happily-ever-after, I’ll devour it. My bookshelves are filled, and I carry my e-reader almost everywhere. I also love romance and adventure in film. There are some movies that I have seen so many times, I’ve lost count. What brings me back time and again? My best-loved films have a sense of adventure, a sigh-worthy hero, and a heroine with a mind of her own.

One of my all-time favorites fits those characteristics perfectly: Sherlock Holmes, the 2009 release starring Robert Downey, Jr. and Rachel McAdams. Sherlock Holmes and the alluring female criminal Irene Adler are one of my most memorable cinema couples. It’s such a pleasure to watch Holmes match wits with Irene, a woman who can hold her own with the brilliant Sherlock. Their chemistry is magnetic, and one can only imagine the passion that will erupt between this couple behind closed doors. The verbal interplay, determination, and sensual tension between Sherlock and Irene provided inspiration for the hero and heroine of my new release, When A Lady Deceives.

In addition to Sherlock and Irene Adler, there are many other movie pairings that I could watch again and again—strong, well-matched characters who face danger and adversity while falling in love. Of course, Sherlock and Irene occupy the top spot in my five favorite movie couples. Rounding out the list:

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Exclusive Excerpt

Exclusive Excerpt: Marie Treanor’s THE PRISONER OF SILVERWOOD CASTLE

Prisoner of Silverwood Castle Marie Treanor

We’re almost done with the week. You know what that means, kids? Rewards! Enjoy this fantastic little excerpt from Marie Treanor‘s The Prisoner of Silverwood Castle, out now!


 

I forgave her all over again when I saw my bedchamber. It was in the old part of the castle, and it had a low, vaulted ceiling and bare, unplastered stone walls on which hung some ancient and very dusty tapestries. Since it was growing dark, I lit the lamp and stood on my trunk to reach the little window catch. I had to wrestle with it to make it open, as if the cobwebs were trying to hold it shut. Although my sisters would not have approved of the housekeeping—and in fact, even I considered a little dusting to be in order here—I liked the little chamber far more than Augusta’s grand, luxurious apartments. It seemed I had maligned my brother-in-law the duke, and he understood me much better than I had thought.

In perfect charity with him, I unpacked my clothes, seized a clean gown to wear for the rest of the evening, and put the rest away in the oak wardrobe which looked a little out of place but was at least useful. I washed my face in the bowl provided, gasping at the coldness of the water, then brushed and repinned my hair, and, with difficulty, found my way back to Augusta’s apartments.

She had a bedroom, a dressing room, a cosy dining room, and a large sitting room. They were all utterly feminine, with no sign of the duke’s accoutrements, so I could only assume his rooms were elsewhere. Perhaps through one of the two doors at the end of the sitting room. I wasn’t sure I would care to live like that if I was married. Provided I liked my husband, of course, and I had long ago decided that nothing except actual love would induce me to marry anyone, however rich, powerful, or influential. Fortunately, my brother the earl seemed to be content with those commodities he’d already gained through my sisters’ marriages, Augusta’s being very much his trump card. So I doubted I would have to fight very hard for my independence. Once I got away from Augusta.

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Q&A

Q&A: We Go on A SCANDALOUS ADVENTURE with Lillian Marek

A Scandalous Adventure Lillian Marek

We didn’t think it was possible to look at something more intriguing than the title for A Scandalous Adventure! Of course, then we took a glance at the Q&A from its author, the amazing Lillian Marek. Classic movies and more have us heaving genre-appropriately heavy sighs. Check out the Q&A below and pick up A Scandalous Adventure, out now!


FAVORITE MOVIES:

 

What are your five favorite movies with romance or romantic elements?

My favorite movies are all pretty old—I like to think of them as classics.

The Prisoner of Zenda (the 1937 version)

It Happened One Night

Singing in the Rain

The Princess Bride

The Uninvited (1944)

 

Describe your favorite scene from each one (you can include a Youtube clip if you want as well).

I realize when I think about it that my favorite scenes are not particularly romantic ones. Hmm.

 

The Prisoner of Zenda

In the climactic duel between Ronald Colman and Douglas Fairbanks Jr., they trade cracks as they fight and Fairbanks leaps into the moat to escape at the end.

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Autumn Thorns Yasmine Galenorn
Cover Reveals

Cover Reveal: HOW TO IMPRESS A MARQUESS by Susanna Ives

The room was filled with audible sighs (mostly from me) when we first read about How To Impress a Marquess (out November 1st, 2016). The latest from Susanna Ives is the perfect storm of everything we love: tragic childhoods, humor, an edge-of-your-seat romance, and fancy Victorian gowns! We can barely wait to get to the cover, so we’ll turn things over to the author herself, Susanna Ives:


I’m an armchair actress. I grew up on the stage and regard writing as a surrogate theater. Being a writer allows me to mentally play every part despite being a petite, middle-aged writer with a soft southern accent. My favorite plays are farces such as The Nerd, Noises Off, and of course, The Importance of Being Ernest. The first books in the Wicked series, Wicked Little Secrets and Wicked, My Love, reflect my love of farce comedy. So I wasn’t sure what I was diving into when I started How to Impress a Marquess because the hero and heroine suffer from childhoods of neglect or abuse—not the material of light farce. I had to strike a delicate balance between the humor and serious emotional elements. The hero and heroine fought their mutual attraction for years because if they gave into their desire, they would face painful personal demons. Yet only through surrendering to their love and owning their hurt could they achieve their deserved Happily Ever After. Despite my early reservations, I found I enjoyed drilling into the emotional lives of the characters, expanding my armchair theatrical horizons.


Alright, we know what you’ve been waiting for! Here’s the cover to How To Impress a Marquess:

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Guest Post

Guest Post: Alissa Johnson’s Favorite Romantic Subplots

A Gift for Guile Alissa Johnson

When I first received the list of possible topics for a guest post on EverAfter Romance, one in particular caught my eye.

“If you like watching X, you’ll love reading Y.”

I really wanted to use that topic. It sounds like so much fun. Sadly, I didn’t have enough suggestions to fill even half a post.

The truth is, I often avoid TV shows and movies that center on relationships. Not always, mind you (my original box set of the 1995 Pride and Prejudice is the sole reason I still own a VCR) but more often than not, I shy away from these types of productions.

There are several reasons for this. 1.) I’m afraid the original source material will be butchered —Nooo! That’s not what happens! 2) I never liked the source material—Yeah, the hero was a jerk in the book, too.  3) I don’t trust the powers-that-be to take their original love story in the direction I want it to go—Aww, they look like the sweetest couple. But there’s only a 50/50 chance of an HEA, so…No.

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Guest Post

Guest Post: “Writing Above the Covers” by Jenn LeBlanc

The Trouble With Grace Jenn LeBlanc

We’ve all heard the old outside the box analogy. I’m twisting it just a bit—because I can. Publishing in general likes to box everything because that makes it easier for marketing strategies. To put it in the most simple terms, they want to know which shelf to put it on in the bookstore.

I don’t fit very well on the shelf in the bookstore. I tend to write beyond the box, and above the covers. I don’t want to hold my characters back because they need to fit on a specific shelf. Writing character driven stories is my jam, my peanut butter, my sourdough and my candy. In doing so I don’t follow a lot of trope rules. What that means is that I have characters you’re not likely to meet in other stories interacting with some that you probably would.

That’s what I love to do most, and why most of my stories are time travel. Taking a modern day professional Dominatrix and tossing her back into stuffy old Victorian England and then…What happens next? An awful lot, as it happens.

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Guest Post

Guest Post: “Five Things To Love About The Gilded Age” by Joanna Shupe

Magnate Joanna Shupe

When I explain that I write romances set in the Gilded Age many people ask, “Wait, when is the Gilded Age again?” Understandable since history classes focus mostly on Tammany Hall and financial scandals that bear a striking resemblance to the end of Trading Places.
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I get it. Crooked politicians are old news to us, and forgettable presidents with boring names (HELLO, Ulysses, Rutherford, Grover, Chester?) aren’t exactly memorable. But wait! Did I mention robber barons? New York’s rigid Knickerbocker society? New money vs. old? Electricity and railroads? The era is rife with conflict and turmoil, the perfect setting to throw in a pair of opposites and watch the sparks fly.

That’s what I did in my new release, Magnate. Born in the slums of Five Points, Emmett Cavanaugh climbed his way to the top of a booming steel empire. He loathes New York’s “high society” types, the ones who never let him forget his past.

Elizabeth Sloane can play the Stock Exchange as deftly as New York’s most accomplished brokers—but she needs a man to put her skills to use. Emmett reluctantly agrees when the stunning socialite asks him to back her trades and split the profits.

These two could not be more different, and serve as just one example of the various groups that collided in the Gilded Age. That melting pot is one reason that helps make this era so unique.

What else makes the Gilded Age stand out?

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