Posts Tagged ‘regency romance’

Exclusive Excerpt

Exclusive Excerpt: Tamara Gill’s ONLY A DUKE WILL DO

Only A Duke Will Do Tamara Gill

We’re back from a holiday weekend and there are only two things keeping us alive right now: Spite and this amazing excerpt from Tamara Gill‘s Only A Duke Will Do!


“I’m sorry you feel that way, but you cannot stop Isolde from marrying. She will marry one day. It may not be me, but it will be someone. And if the reports around London are correct, she is looking for a husband.”

“Damn you to hell.” Merrick left Wardoor, grabbed a half-filled bottle of whisky from the pavilion, and started toward the Italian Walk. He found a secluded grassy spot within the trees. The sweet-smelling scent floating on the breeze did little to lesson his ire.

Merrick clung to the tree branch above his head and fought not to snap it off, imagining it as Wardoor’s neck. He flung back a good portion of the whisky and welcomed the burn to his throat. How could his closest friend do this to him?

The thought of Isolde welcoming his attentions was like a physical blow.

Damn them. Damn him.

“Moore!”

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Q&A

Q&A: Nicola Davidson of THE DEVIL’S SUBMISSION

The Devil's Submission by Nicola Davidson

Hard day? We’ve got exactly what you need, because Nicola Davidson is back! Don’t miss our Q&A, or The Devil’s Submission, out now!


 

What are your five favorite movies with romance or romantic elements?

I’d have to say Love Actually, Emma, The Notebook, Braveheart, and Pride and Prejudice.

 

Love Actually: I adored all the characters in this movie, but especially liked Jamie (Colin Firth) and Aurelia (Lucia Moniz.) So many sweet, funny scenes as they attempted to communicate, getting it wrong but still unable to deny the growing attraction to each other. My favorite scene is when he leaves the awkward family Christmas and instead flies back to her, making his declaration in the restaurant in broken Portuguese. SO romantic! And then it turns out she took English lessons ‘Just in cases’. Swoon. Love conquers all – even the language barrier.

 

Emma: Ohhhh, Mr. Knightley (Jeremy Northam.) Both stuffy and sweet, a real gentleman’s gentleman Regency hero. It is equal parts annoying and sniffle-worthy as he drops subtle, awkward hints about his feelings for Emma that she keeps missing. But then comes the last scene in the movie with one of the truly great romantic lines: ‘Marry me, my wonderful, darling friend.’

 

The Notebook: What a perfectly cast movie. Noah (Ryan Gosling) and Allie (Rachel McAdams) were just brilliant together as the working class man and his society princess trying to break free. Although there are SO many fabulous scenes, a random one sticks out for me. Again, near the end, when Allie has to choose between her fiancé Lon and Noah. She pulls up outside Noah’s house in her car, hops out with her suitcases, and gives him the big shrug. Not a word is said but it captures one of the key essences of love – the heart wants what it wants, even if on paper it seems like absolutely the wrong choice.

 

Braveheart: Before the patriotism and raging bloody battles, there was an incredibly sweet romance between William Wallace (Mel Gibson) and Murron MacClannough (Catherine McCormack) childhood friends reunited as adults. Their courtship is just delicious, tender yet full of wonderful crisp banter that says their minds are in accord as much as their hearts. The scene when they sit together on the rock and he offers to teach her to read is gorgeous enough, but when they arrive back at her home and he presents her with the thistle she gave him as a child at his father and brother’s funeral…oh my.

 

Pride and Prejudice: I love the dynamics between Lizzie Bennett (Keira Knightley) and Mr. Darcy (Mathew McFadyen). She is so smart and witty and outspoken. He is stuffy and rigid and honorable. They shouldn’t work as a couple, but they do—and it’s because both learn to look below the surface, and trust their hearts when circumstances around them make them doubt what they feel. The scene at the end where he strides toward her in the dewy grass, now slightly unbuttoned and purposeful, and she knows he has done her and her family the greatest of favors and is open to seeing the kind heart beneath his crisp exterior…SWOON.

I’d say I thought about all these movies a bit while writing The Devil’s Submission. Devil is kind of a raunchy hybrid Knightley/Darcy, in that he is rigid and reserved, a bookish man whose submissive need for pain with his pleasure weighs heavily on his heart. He is in desperate need of a strong, sassy lady to lure him out of his shell and show him the way to happiness. Eliza, his estranged wife has one heck of a battle on her hands. Luckily she is more than bold and brave enough for the task. I also love the fact that when their walls come down, they can really talk. I like my scorching hot lust with a large side of friendship, I think that is what ices the happily ever after cake. The knowledge that they like as well as want each other, which is a pretty strong foundation for lasting love.

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Q&A

Q&A: Nicola Davidson of SURRENDER TO SIN

Surrender to Sin Nicola Davidson

Hump day? No problem. We’ve got an interview with Nicola Davidson, author of Surrender To Sin, that’s sure to take the mid-week blues far, far away. “I like my scorching hot lust with a large side of friendship” might just be the best thing we’ve read all week!


FAVORITE MOVIES:

 

What are your five favorite movies with romance or romantic elements?

I’d have to say Love Actually, Emma, The Notebook, Braveheart, and Kate and Leopold.

Love Actually: I adored all the characters in this movie, but especially liked Jamie (Colin Firth) and Aurelia (Lucia Moniz.) So many sweet, funny scenes as they attempted to communicate, getting it wrong but still unable to deny the growing attraction to each other. My favorite scene is when he leaves the awkward family Christmas and instead flies back to her, making his declaration in the restaurant in broken Portuguese. SO romantic! And then it turns out she took English lessons ‘Just in cases’. Swoon. Love conquers all – even the language barrier.

Emma: Ohhhh, Mr. Knightley (Jeremy Northam.) Both stuffy and sweet, a real gentleman’s gentleman Regency hero. It is equal parts annoying and sniffle-worthy as he drops subtle, awkward hints about his feelings for Emma that she keeps missing. But then comes the last scene in the movie with one of the truly great romantic lines: ‘Marry me, my wonderful, darling friend.’

The Notebook: What a perfectly cast movie. Noah (Ryan Gosling) and Allie (Rachel McAdams) were just brilliant together as the working class man and his society princess trying to break free. Although there are SO many fabulous scenes, a random one sticks out for me. Again, near the end, when Allie has to choose between her fiancé Lon and Noah. She pulls up outside Noah’s house in her car, hops out with her suitcases, and gives him the big shrug. Not a word is said but it captures one of the key essences of love – the heart wants what it wants, even if on paper it seems like absolutely the wrong choice.

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Guest Post, Q&A

Q&A: Elyssa Patrick of ONCE UPON A CHRISTMAS

Once Upon a Christmas Elyssa Patrick J.K. Coi Tiffany Clare Maggie Robinson

Hi everyone! My name is Elyssa Patrick, and I’m one of the authors of the Christmas anthology, Once Upon a Christmas.


Here is the blurb for Once Upon a Christmas:

The holidays are a time for family, celebration—and the Dukes of Ravenglass to fall in love. Spend the Christmas season with the Wynter family, as the Dukes of Ravenglass find their happily-ever-afters in this delightful, heartfelt collection that spans from the Regency era to the present day.

In A Price Above Rubies by Maggie Robinson, set in the Regency era, paid companion Helen Lowe doesn’t know the man she shares her first-ever dance—and first-ever kiss—is Gabriel Wynter, a reclusive, notorious duke. When Helen flees after being exposed, she leaves behind something of far greater value than a glass slipper. Can Gabriel find her, return it, and finally open his heart?

In the Victorian-era set, Never Have I Ever Fallen in Love with a Duke by Tiffany Clare, Alexander Wynter has a problem—his best friend’s younger sister grew up. When he agreed to help Emily MacCallon make her debut, he didn’t expect the beautiful, alluring woman before him—or for her to lead him on such a merry chase. Alexander knows one thing: the only man she’ll be kissing forever and ever is him.

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Autumn Thorns Yasmine Galenorn
Guest Post

Guest Post: Amy Sandas on the Best Piece of Writing Advice She Ever Received

The Untouchable Earl Amy Sandas

Once upon a time, when I was young and hopeful and naïve, I dreamed of writing romance novels. No. I yearned to write romance novels. I fell asleep thinking of my characters and their lives. I woke up missing them. I developed in-depth, real-time scenes in my head for the first kiss, the black moment, the resolution, and every poignant interaction in between. At one point, I went to a Tarot card reader (as one does when one wants desperately to know if ones dreams will come true) and this is what she said:

Just keep writing and the rest will come.

I walked away feeling bereft. Why? Because writing was the one thing I wasn’t doing. And I was afraid that it was the one thing I couldn’t do.

Now, of course I was doing some writing at this point and had been for years. Snippets of character description, short paragraphs or even single lines that would pop into my head at a time when the only thing I had to write on was a gum wrapper. On a few occasions, I’d even started a couple different novels. But I wouldn’t keep writing.

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Steals & Deals

Deal Alert: Tarryn Fisher, Jaima Fixsen, and Juliette Sobanet

Deal Alert Sept30

We’re loading our eReaders with books to save us from our weekday commutes! Stock up on these amazing reads from Tarryn Fisher, Jaima Fixsen, and Juliette Sobanet while the sales last!


F*ck Love by Tarryn Fisher

Helena Conway has fallen in love.

Unwillingly. Unwittingly.

But not unprovoked.

Kit Isley is everything she’s not—unstructured, untethered, and not even a little bit careful.

It could all be so beautiful … if he wasn’t dating her best friend.

Helena must defy her heart, do the right thing, and think of others.

Until she doesn’t.


Fairchild Jaima Fixen
Fairchild by Jaima Fixsen

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Guest Post

Guest Post: “Why Historical Is My Favorite Romance Genre” by Susanne Lord

Discovery of Desire Susanne Lord

Like most of you, I have little stacks of to-be-read books teetering around the house, and waiting patiently on my kindle and nook.  For the past few years, the breakdown by genre looks a lot like this pie chart.  Historical is obviously the favorite, with other romance genres lagging way, way behind.  I’ve tried contemporaries, but I find them less enjoyable to read, as I’m always inserting my cynical, day-to-day reality into them.

If you’ve ever wondered why you like a particular romance genre, the answer isn’t really all that easy to come to.  When I tried, here’s what I came up with…


EverAfterPieChart_SusanneLordThere’s Loads of Time for Heroes to Brood

My newest historical romance, Discovery of Desire, is set in the mid-Victorian era (1851) and is the story of an English explorer and a shy, but determined, Derbyshire woman, who sail by steamship from England to Bombay, and back.  Seth Mayhew and Wilhelmina Adams make the perilous journey for different reasons: Seth to find a lost sister, and Mina to wed a civil servant stationed in India.  (Spoiler alert: Mina’s plans are gonna change.)

In 1851, that journey takes over three months, with caravan travel across Egypt before getting back on a boat at Suez.  165 years later, Seth could fly to India in 9 hours with a $600 round-trip ticket.

Travel took a lot of time, never mind overseas travel.  In-country, the carriages moved at three to six miles per hour, and then there was all the stops and horse re-freshing at the posting inns.  Today, we demand speed, and coffee in a cardboard cup, and constant entertainment.  I can’t help but think: what’s a contemporary Heathcliff going to brood over if there’s Pokemon Go in the world?


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Q&A

Q&A: THE REBEL HEIR by Elizabeth Michels

The Rebel Heir Elizabeth Michels

I didn’t think it was possible to want to high-five a blog post, but it is! Elizabeth Michels isn’t just a great author–she also has excellent taste and the best strategy for being stranded anywhere, at any time! So, basically: she’s a delight. Lucky you, you can read more from her with The Rebel Heir, which is out right now!


FAVORITE MOVIES:

 

What are your five favorite movies with romance or romantic elements?

I love movies, especially when those movies come with a heavy dose of romance. Some of my favorites are:  The Princess Bride, Notting Hill, Dirty Dancing, About Time, and The Holiday. There are so many other great ones, but these top my favorites list.

 

Describe your favorite scene from each one (you can include a Youtube clip if you want as well).

These are a few of my favorite scenes…did you just sing that?  I did. grins It’s so hard to decide on just one scene for this first movie.  There are so many great scenes from The Princess Bride! It’s a classic! But I’ll go with the one I quote more than any other: the wedding scene with the wrong groom and the best priest ever! I wish he could have officiated my wedding. “Have you the wing?”

 

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Guest Post

Guest Post: Jane Ashford’s Top Favorite Romance Movies

What The Duke Doesn't Know Jane Ashford

What are my top five favorite romance movies you ask? Here they are, starting with the classic –

Sense and Sensibility I’m betting that most of you are familiar with Jane Austen’s story of two sisters with different temperaments, re-imagined as a film by the wonderful Emma Thompson. I’m all Team Elinor (Emma) here. I guess I identify with the person holding it together while those all around melt down.

This is a classic Regency story. The Dashwood estate is entailed, and Elinor and Marianne (Kate Winslet) lose their home upon their father’s death. Their brother’s wife is a shrew and convinces him not to help them. They and their mother and little sister retreat to a cottage (which looks rather nice to me), where Marianne falls for Willoughby, a charming lightweight. Elinor is already in love with Edward Ferrars, but both sisters discover that marriage is problematic without money in the nineteenth century. Marianne has a breakdown; Elinor keeps quiet about her pain. Two approaches to the vicissitudes of life. In the end they both get a happy ending, though Elinor’s is a little happier.


Truly Madly Deeply

Truly Madly Deeply This movie is an unconventional romance, but I find it touching. Nina (Juliet Stevenson) is mourning the recent death of her boyfriend, Jamie (Alan Rickman). When she’s falling into despair, Jamie comes back as a ghost and haunts her. She’s delighted! Until Jamie begins to be annoying — turning the heat up to tropical, rearranging the furniture, filling the place with irritating ghost friends. Even so, when Nina meets Mark, an attractive psychologist, she holds back because of Jamie’s continued presence in her life, infuriating as he’s become. Jamie leaves to allow her to move on, and it becomes clear that he came back to help Nina recover by tarnishing her idealized image of him. He cared that much.

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Exclusive Excerpt, Giveaway

Exclusive Excerpt + GIVEAWAY: AS RICH AS A ROGUE by Jade Lee

As Rich as a Rogue Jade Lee

Read a Romance Month has us seriously reflecting on our book shelves. What is it about a good Regency Romance that we just can’t help going back to time and time again? Is it the high stakes, the drama, the surprisingly endless snark and banter? We can’t pick just one thing, but we do know that books like As Rich as a Rogue by Jade Lee have a magic way of pulling us in entirely! And lucky you, we’ve got an excerpt right here! As Rich as a Rogue is out right now!

Can’t wait to get it? Enter for a chance to win one of two copies below!


Intro from Jade Lee

Lord Whitly and Miss Mari Powel have history. Six years ago he gave her the nickname Wayward Welsh and that has dogged her so much that she can’t find a husband. Now the blighter has returned and is courting her when she can barely keep herself from scratching out his eyes. In this scene, she’s lost a wager to him and has to go riding with him. In true heroine fashion, she uses the time to demand an explanation for his actions.


“Why are you in Society if you have such a great disregard for it?” She spoke impetuously, trampling over his words in her rush to get the question out. He had such power to distract her that she feared losing track of it altogether if she did not say it quickly.

But once spoken, she began to regret her question. It was what she had wanted to know almost from the very beginning. Why was he here? Why did he accost her in Hyde Park that first day? Why did he seek her out at last night’s ball?

But the more the questions crowded in her mind, the more his expression made her doubt her own sanity. Or his. Because far from quietly considering her request, he stared at her in stunned surprise.

In the end, she had to prompt him to speak. “My lord?”

“Truly, Miss Powel, I cannot guess whether I am especially bad at this or if you are being willfully obtuse.”

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