Posts Tagged ‘series’

Q&A

Q&A With New York Times Bestselling Author Penny Reid! | DR. STRANGE BEARD

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Do you read much and if so who are your favorite authors?

Yes! I read as much as time allows. I love David Sedaris and read everything he writes.

In the romance genre, I adore Lisa Kleypas and Amy Harmon, and actually had a super awkward interaction with Amy Harmon the first time I met her. She walked onto a hotel elevator in the middle of the night (had just flown in for a signing) and I was on the elevator (having just returned from dinner). I saw her, gasped, pointed, and said, “Oh my God. You’re Amy Harmon. I don’t know where to look.” Because, really, where does one look after saying such a thing? It’s the only time in my entire life I’ve every fangirled to such an extent.

The closest I’d come prior was when I met Francis Collins (former head of the NIH and Human Genome Project). I shook his hand but couldn’t seem to form words.

What works best for you: Typewriters, fountain pen, dictate, computer or longhand?

Early chapters are started on my Freewrite (which is an e-ink typewriter). I love it. No distractions, no self-editing, just words on the page. I then transfer the file to Word and edit on a laptop. Once I’m 3-4 chapters in, the rest is usually done on my laptop.

How important is research to you when writing a book?

Oh jeez, so incredibly important. My readers are nerds (which is fabulous), but it means that they’ll let me know if I miss a detail or make an error. Not just that, but when the author pays appropriate attention to the details and minutia of a subject, it allows the overall story to feel more authentic. And, therefore, readers are better able to suspend disbelief and submerge themselves completely in a book.

What is the hardest thing about writing?

Writing is like exercising, or eating well, or knitting. It’s the antithesis of instant gratification. One must write (or exercise, or eat well, or knit) every day in order to see progress. The most difficult part for me is trusting that, eventually, writing every day will actually yield a finished product. Even after 18 books, I still have doubts that I’ll actually finish my current work-in-progress.

What would you say is the easiest aspect of writing?

Dialogue. Oftentimes, when I don’t know where to start a scene, I start with a conversation. For better or worse, I’ve become quite adept at carrying on conversation with the voices in my head.

What makes the Romance genre so special?

To my knowledge, romance is the only genre where happiness and fulfillment are celebrated.


Penny Reid is the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, and USA Today Best Selling Author of the Winston Brothers, Knitting in the City, Rugby, and Hypothesis series. She used to spend her days writing federal grant proposals as a biomedical researcher, but now she just writes books. She’s also a full time mom to three diminutive adults, wife, daughter, knitter, crocheter, sewer, general crafter, and thought ninja.

FOLLOW PENNY:
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Twitter: www.twitter.com/reidromance
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Guest Post

Guest Post: Yasmine Galenorn on Returning to an Old Series

Night Shivers Yasmine Galenorn

Today we have Yasmine Galenorn talking about how it felt to return to her Indigo Court series for her latest novella, Night Shivers. We’re excited to have her and hope you’ll pick up a copy today! Be sure and leave a comment below for a chance to win a signed copy of Night Myst, the first book in the Indigo Court series!


When I finished writing NIGHT’S END, I really thought I was done with the series. I brought the Myst story arc to a finish, and added an epilogue so people wouldn’t feel like they were left hanging. The epilogue happened twenty-five years after the end of the story arc. For months now I’ve had people asking me for more—they want to read more about what happened to Cicely and the others. And each time I have said, “Sorry, I’m done with the story and I left it it a good ending.”

So imagine my surprise when a new idea for the Indigo Court world suddenly popped into my mind. I realized — now free from the story arc of the battle against Myst, and free to take the series in any direction I want — there are other stories I can tell. Stories that I probably couldn’t get published in traditional ways. So, I decided to write a novella set one year after the end of the last battle.

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Giveaway, Guest Post

Guest Post: Alison Kent on Anticipation in Romance Series

The Comfort of Favorite Things Alison Kent

Alison Kent’s Hope Springs Series continues with The Comfort of Favorite Things, a second-chance romance set in Alison’s fictional Texas town. Like all of us, Alison is an enthusiastic reader who loves series, and is always interested in what — or more importantly, who — is next. She’s here to talk about series romance, and why she keeps returning to Hope Springs. Don’t keep US waiting, Alison!

(Also, check out the giveaway at the end of Alison’s post for a chance to win a copy of The Comfort of Favorite Things! US residents only)


Anticipation … it’s keeping me waiting.

How many times have you read a book series, and kept waiting and waiting for the author to tell the story of your favorite character? Virgin River, the Black Dagger Brotherhood, the McCloud Brothers.

Series pull us into the worlds authors create. We fall in love with the characters. We smell the enchiladas they eat in their favorite restaurants. We hear the beans grinding in their favorite coffee shop. We watch the sun set across the pasture behind the house that is the focal point of their lives.

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Guest Post

Guest Post: “Happy Endings Can Be Sad…For the Author” by Cecilia Tan

The Poet and the Prophecy Cecilia Tan

Cecilia Tan’s Magic University series comes to a conclusion with the release of The Poet and the Prophecy, out today. Cecilia is happy to bring the series to a conclusion–but also sad to see it end. She explains her mixed emotions below. Thanks, Cecilia!


This week the final volume in my Magic University series has finally hit shelves/Kindles and it seems a good moment to reflect on endings and the ending of a series.

I know not all series are like this. Some seemingly could go on forever. At a panel called “How NOT To End A Series” at the RWA national conference this year bestselling author Shannon Stacey lamented that she had to end her Kowlaskis Series because “I ran out of Kowalskis.”

But in a series like Magic University, which mixes fantasy with new adult romance, I knew I had a set endpoint. Like the Harry Potter series which inspired it, Magic University has one book per year of school. Book four, The Poet and the Prophecy, is Kyle’s senior year. In fantasy, there is always a quest: I combined fantasy and romance here by making it a quest to find true love, a quest that takes four years to complete.

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Autumn Thorns Yasmine Galenorn
Giveaway, Guest Post

Guest Post: “The Long Running Series: How Hard Can It Be?” by Marie Force

When you’re writing a long-running series, how do you keep the chemistry between reoccurring characters genuine, and, well, sexy? We asked contemporary romance author Marie Force to tell us how she manages to keep us loving the characters in her suspenseful Fatal Series through nine books and two novellas. (And, as an added bonus, Marie gave us two sets of the print editions of the Fatal Series to give away! See the Rafflecopter at the bottom of this post.)


Today is the release day for Fatal Frenzy, book 9 in my Fatal Series, which is now five years old with no end in sight. It’s a tiny bit surreal to consider that this series has now gone to nine books—and two novellas—when you consider its somewhat inauspicious beginning. I wanted to write a series that featured the same couple in every book—a female homicide detective who is romantically involved with an up-and-coming politician. Editors love the idea for the first book, but weren’t too keen on the idea of the same couple headlining every book in the series. “It’s simply not done in romance,” one editor famously told me.

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