Posts Tagged ‘editing’

Aural Pleasures

Songs for Romance Fans, Edited by an Editor

I never used to be a music listener when I was writing or editing. Give me silence or the innocuous buzz of conversation at a coffee shop, but music always distracted me. Until I met a greater distraction: the open-plan office.

I edit Romance and YA over at Diversion Books, big sister of EverAfter. Our office is awesome, but it’s also completely open, so I often need to plug into headphones to avoid getting sidetracked by phone calls, meetings, or constant debates on the best flavor of La Croix. Here’s a sampling of the songs I like to edit Romance to. Hopefully they can inspire you music-listening writers out there, or at the very least provide an outlet for anyone trying to work on sexy scenes while surrounded by coworkers.


Spinners by The Hold Steady

This song reminds me of the way a lot of romances start: with characters who feel lost, who are moving through unsatisfying relationships, who may be trying to escape something. It’s emotional but upbeat, and makes for superb writing or editing music.

Recommended for: Those moments at the beginning before our protagonists have met.

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Q&A

Q&A: Rachel Kramer Bussel from BEGGING FOR IT

Begging For It Rachel Kramer Bussel

You caught us. We’re big nerds about the writing/publishing process, or How It Really Gets Made: Book Edition, so when we heard Begging For It was going to be an Erotica anthology written for all kinds of women, by women, we had to get just a touch serious. It’s a collection that’s immediately dear to our hearts and we’re so lucky to get a brief peek into the mind of its editor, Rachel Kramer Bussel. So we probed a little about the editing process along with our usual never-ending grill about Romance favorites and snack choices (because we’re still us). Love the glimpse from our Q&A? Lucky you, Begging For It is out right now!


What’s the most exciting part of putting together an Erotic Romance collection (besides the obvious)?

I always look for the sweet spot in terms of variety so my readers remain interested. I want them to find the book something greater than the sum of its parts, where the stories do somewhat speak to each other in some way without repeating scenarios.

 

What’s the most difficult part?

It’s always tough to have to turn down stories, but I was really impressed with how the authors I did include tackled the concept of “fantasy.” That was the main theme but they took it and ran with it, so I think the final book has sexual fantasies readers have likely considered before, or possibly shared, and plenty readers haven’t.

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